The Ides of March


CAESAR
Who is it in the press that calls on me?
I hear a tongue, shriller than all the music,
Cry ‘Caesar!’ Speak; Caesar is turn’d to hear.
Soothsayer
Beware the ides of March.
CAESAR
What man is that?
BRUTUS
A soothsayer bids you beware the ides of March.
CAESAR
Set him before me; let me see his face.
CASSIUS
Fellow, come from the throng; look upon Caesar.
CAESAR
What say’st thou to me now? speak once again.
Soothsayer
Beware the ides of March.
CAESAR
He is a dreamer; let us leave him: pass.
Julius Ceasar, Act I Scene II

In Ancient Rome, the 15th of March, the Ides of March, was a feast day of the God of War, Mars, and a day devoted to military parades and celebrations.
On the ides of March, in 44 BC, Gaius Julius Ceasar, Dictator of Rome, was stabbed and killed by a conspiracy led by Gaius Cassius Longinus and his brother-in-law Marcus Junius Brutus, in a failed attempt to restore the Roman Republic.
If you have seen the HBO Series Rome, or seen the Shakespeare play, you are familiar with the basic details of the plot and its results. No matter how noble the intentions of the conspirators were (and that is extremely arguable), in the end, what the conspirators were trying to prevent by killing Gaius Julius Ceasar, they instead hastened and made manifest.