Category Archives: History and Culture

Beware the Ides of March

CAESAR
Who is it in the press that calls on me?
I hear a tongue, shriller than all the music,
Cry ‘Caesar!’ Speak; Caesar is turn’d to hear.
Soothsayer
Beware the ides of March.
CAESAR
What man is that?
BRUTUS
A soothsayer bids you beware the ides of March.
CAESAR
Set him before me; let me see his face.
CASSIUS
Fellow, come from the throng; look upon Caesar.
CAESAR
What say’st thou to me now? speak once again.
Soothsayer
Beware the ides of March.
CAESAR
He is a dreamer; let us leave him: pass.
Sennet. Exeunt all except BRUTUS and CASSIUS
Julius Ceasar, Act I, Scene II

Ring out Solstice Bells

Now is the Solstice of the Year
Winter is the Glad song that you hear
Seven maids move in seven time
Have the lads ready up in a line
Ring out these bells
Ring out, Ring Solstice Bells
Ring Solstice Bells
Join together beneath the mistletoe
By the holy oak where on it grows
Seven druids dance in seven time
Sing the song the bells call loudly chiming
Ring out these bells
Ring out, Ring Solstice Bells
Ring Solstice Bells
Praise be to the distant sister sun
Joyful as the silver planets run
Seven maids move in seven time
Sing the song the bells call loudly chiming
Ring out these bells
Ring out, Ring Solstice Bells
Ring Solstice Bells
Ring on, Ring Out
Ring on, Ring Out
Jethro Tull, _Ring Solstice Bells_

Picture of the Day: The Lost Tettegouche Arch


The (lost) Tettegouche Arch
Originally uploaded by Jvstin

Today’s picture for you is of something that no longer exists.

This is the Tettegouche Arch, in Tettegouche State Park, Minnesota. Over the weekend, erosion finally caused the keystone of the arch to collapse. I took this picture of the now lost arch in April 2009.

An article on the destroyed arch is here:

http://www.duluthnewstribune.com/event/article/id/176979/

Picture of the Day: Quake Lake


Quake Lake
Originally uploaded by Jvstin

Today’s picture for you takes us to Gallatin National Forest and the aptly named (via a massive 1959 temblor) Quake Lake.

The earthquake measured 7.3 on the Richter scale (Revised by USGS to 7.6) and caused an 80 million ton landslide which formed a landslide dam on the Madison River. The landslide traveled down the south flank of Sheep Mountain, at an estimated 100 miles per hour (160 km/h), killing 28 people who were camping along the shores of Hebgen Lake and downstream along the Madison River. Upstream the faulting caused by the earthquake forced the waters of Hebgen Lake to shift violently. A seiche, a wave effect of both wind and water, crested over Hebgen Dam, causing cracks and erosion. Besides being the largest known earthquake to have struck the state of Montana in recorded history, it is also the largest earthquake to occur in the Northern Rockies for centuries and is one of the largest earthquakes ever to hit the United States in recorded history.

Americans clueless, film at 11

Via Bob collins on MPR
A substantial minority of Americans do not have a clue about our National History. From a Marist Poll:
On July 4th we celebrate Independence Day. From which country did the United States win its independence?

Great Britain Unsure Other countries mentioned
USA Residents 74% 20% 6%

Yep, that’s right.
26% of Americans did not know that we declared independence from Great Britain. The full poll results, on Bob’s site linked above, breaks it down by region and age category.
Even the BEST category still has 14% of USA Residents not knowing the most fundamental fact about our nation.

Memorial Day: My Father

My father, Frederick Michael Weimer.
He served as a seaman second class aboard the USS Block Island, the only American aircraft carrier sunk by the Germans during World War II.
Six sailors perished in the torpedo attack on the Block Island by a U-boat patrolling the Atlantic Ocean near the Canary Islands on May 29, 1944. But the remaining 951 Navy personnel, including my father, were evacuated safely to other vessels. He was discharged in 1946.
My father died in 2005.
Rest in Peace, Dad.

Time Magazine on the Ricci Map

http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1968087,00.html
Time Magazine has a good article on the Matteo Ricci map created in China, and coming, permanently, to the University of Minnesota.
I first came across Matteo Ricci in a Jonathan Spence (one of the best scholars on China living today) and have been fascinated about his life and adventures. That biography did mention the map’s creation, and I can’t wait to see it at last!

MIA scores a coup with Titian exhibit

Via MPR
The Minneapolis Institute of Arts will host an exhibit of Venetian Renaissance paintings and drawings which have never been to the U.S. before…Noon says the exhibit of 12 paintings and 13 drawings will be a rare opportunity to see Titian’s work, and how he influenced other major artists, including Tintoretto, Veronese, Bassano and Lotto — whose work will also be part of the exhibit.
The exhibit, “Titian and the Golden Age of Venetian Painting: Masterpieces from the National Galleries of Scotland,” will be on display in February 2011.

I’m definitely going to go see this when it comes to Minneapolis.